What are the barriers to understanding pointers and what can be done to overcome them? [closed]

Tags: c++ c pointers
Question!

Why are pointers such a leading factor of confusion for many new, and even old, college level students in C or C++? Are there any tools or thought processes that helped you understand how pointers work at the variable, function, and beyond level?

What are some good practice things that can be done to bring somebody to the level of, "Ah-hah, I got it," without getting them bogged down in the overall concept? Basically, drill like scenarios.



Answers

In my first Comp Sci class, we did the following exercise. Granted, this was a lecture hall with roughly 200 students in it...

Professor writes on the board: int john;

John stands up

Professor writes: int *sally = &john;

Sally stands up, points at john

Professor: int *bill = sally;

Bill stands up, points at John

Professor: int sam;

Sam stands up

Professor: bill = &sam;

Bill now points to Sam.

I think you get the idea. I think we spent about an hour doing this, until we went over the basics of pointer assignment.

By : Tryke


Why are pointers such a leading factor of confusion for many new, and even old, college level students in the C/C++ language?

The concept of a placeholder for a value - variables - maps onto something we're taught in school - algebra. There isn't an existing parallel you can draw without understanding how memory is physically laid out within a computer, and no one thinks about this kind of thing until they're dealing with low level things - at the C/C++/byte communications level.

Are there any tools or thought processes that helped you understand how pointers work at the variable, function, and beyond level?

Addresses boxes. I remember when I was learning to program BASIC into microcomputers, there were these pretty books with games in them, and sometimes you had to poke values into particular addresses. They had a picture of a bunch of boxes, incrementally labelled with 0, 1, 2... and it was explained that only one small thing (a byte) could fit in these boxes, and there were a lot of them - some computers had as many as 65535! They were next to each other, and they all had an address.

What are some good practice things that can be done to bring somebody to the level of, "Ah-hah, I got it," without getting them bogged down in the overall concept? Basically, drill like scenarios.

For a drill? Make a struct:

struct {
char a;
char b;
char c;
char d;
} mystruct;
mystruct.a = 'r';
mystruct.b = 's';
mystruct.c = 't';
mystruct.d = 'u';

char* my_pointer;
my_pointer = &mystruct.b;
cout << 'Start: my_pointer = ' << *my_pointer << endl;
my_pointer++;
cout << 'After: my_pointer = ' << *my_pointer << endl;
my_pointer = &mystruct.a;
cout << 'Then: my_pointer = ' << *my_pointer << endl;
my_pointer = my_pointer + 3;
cout << 'End: my_pointer = ' << *my_pointer << endl;

Same example as above, except in C:

// Same example as above, except in C:
struct {
    char a;
    char b;
    char c;
    char d;
} mystruct;

mystruct.a = 'r';
mystruct.b = 's';
mystruct.c = 't';
mystruct.d = 'u';

char* my_pointer;
my_pointer = &mystruct.b;

printf("Start: my_pointer = %c\n", *my_pointer);
my_pointer++;
printf("After: my_pointer = %c\n", *my_pointer);
my_pointer = &mystruct.a;
printf("Then: my_pointer = %c\n", *my_pointer);
my_pointer = my_pointer + 3;
printf("End: my_pointer = %c\n", *my_pointer);

Output:

Start: my_pointer = s
After: my_pointer = t
Then: my_pointer = r
End: my_pointer = u

Perhaps that explains some of the basics through example?

By : Josh


An analogy I've found helpful for explaining pointers is hyperlinks. Most people can understand that a link on a web page 'points' to another page on the internet, and if you can copy & paste that hyperlink then they will both point to the same original web page. If you go and edit that original page, then follow either of those links (pointers) you'll get that new updated page.

By : Wilka


This video can help you solving your question :)
By: admin